Articles by Alberto T. Estévez and Diego Navarro Included in Book on Conservation, Networks and Technoscience

29/10/14
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Dr. Alberto T. Estévez, a Projects Professor and the Director of the Master's Programme in Biodigital Architecture at the UIC's ESARQ School of Architecture, has collaborated with Diego Navarro, an ESARQ alumnus and a Projects Professor at the same institute, to produce two articles for inclusion in Innovaciones artísticas y nuevos medios: conservación, redes y tecnociencia (Artistic Innovations and New Media: Conservation, Networks and Technoscience), a book that has been published by the Universitat de Barcelona's Research Group on Art, Architecture and Digital Society.

Articles by Alberto T. Estévez and Diego Navarro Included in Book on Conservation, Networks and Technoscience

The book is the outcome of the conference cycle the  5th International Congress: Artistic Innovations and New Media: Conservation, Networks and Technoscience, which was organized by the research group of the History of Art Department at the Universitat de Barcelona (UB) in May 2012. The objective of the cycle was the study of different artistic and architectural disciplines in relation to information and communications technologies and the digital world.

The conferences focused on conservation, networks and technoscience in general, with a number of more specific talks given by artists, philosophers and architects.

Dr. Estévez, in his article “Interactions Between Art, Architecture and Science in the Biotechnological Era”, refers to the imminent arrival of a time in which biology will play a key role in artistic, architectural and scientific development. He also casts a negative eye over, and offers alternative interpretations of, certain examples of so-called “genetic art”.

Navarro, in his article “The New Nature”, provides a brief analysis of humanity’s relationship with nature, looking at the domestication of plant life for use in cities, the false idea of “balance” and the concept of humanity as a legitimate force for change. He contrasts these ideas with experimental architectural projects that aim to invert the impact that architecture tends to have on natural and/or living elements.