The combination of salt particles and polymers in 3D scaffold printing is proven to enhance bone regeneration

13/07/20
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Such is the revelation by a recent study to come out of the University of Queensland in which Román Pérez, director of the Bioengeenering Institute of Technology at UIC Barcelona, has participated

The combination of salt particles and polymers in 3D scaffold printing is proven to enhance bone regeneration
Several studies have so far explored the application of 3D printed scaffolds for bone regeneration.  However, until recently, none of them had tried combining 3D printing and salt particles. The researchers from the University of Queensland (Australia), UIC Barcelona and Metro North Hospital and Health Service in Brisbane (Australia) who have led the study entitled “Porous 3D Printed Scaffolds for Guided Bone Regeneration in a Rat Calvarial Defect Model”, have been able to demonstrate that by introducing microscale porosity to the scaffolds printed using 3D technology, it is possible to considerably improve bone regeneration. 
 
“For this study we have incorporated salt particles to synthetic polymers, which is the material used to print 3D scaffolds. When we submerged the pieces in water, we noticed how the salt particles broke free whilst the polymer remained intact”, explained Román Pérez. “This creates microporosities that allow more cells to adhere to the scaffolds while aiding the formation of blood clots and the regeneration of bone tissue”.
 
The paper has been published recently in the journal Applied Materials Today