Carmen Mendoza takes part in the presentation of Jonathan F. P. Rose’s book at the COAC

30/04/19
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The event endorsed sustainable housing and the recovery of green spaces in cities

On 10 April, renowned American urban planner and writer Jonathan F. P. Rose presented his book The Well-Tempered City (the Spanish version published by Antoni Bosch Editor) at the headquarters of the Association of Architects of Catalonia. The presentation hinged upon a round table discussion moderated by architect Maria Sisterrnas, in which, in addition to the author, the assistant director of International Relations for the UIC Barcelona School of Architecture, Carmen Mendoza, and architects Antoni Sorolla and Ana Puig Pey also took part. The event was also organised by lecturer Ana Cocho-Bermejo. 

Rose is considered one of the most important American minds in questions of urban planning and is famous for designing projects that integrate environmental, social and economic solutions to the problems of contemporary cities. “I started thinking about this book when I was 20, and today I’m 67. This essay was born of a need to create a science for cities that, at that time, did not exist”, explained Rose during his turn to respond. “At the end of the century, 80% of the population will live in cities”, he added. “We must therefore create solutions for a world marked by overexploitation and climate change”.

In her response, Carmen Mendoza underscored the importance of the American author’s theoretical contributions, going on to add that “communities play a crucial role when talking about sustainable transition models”. She also emphasised how important it is for both architects and urban planners to address not only the physical space of the cities but also the social space in their work.  

In addition to his academic work, Jonathan F.P. Rose also plans and builds, in cooperation with local authorities and non-profit organisations, sustainable housing and cultural, health and education centres. His work has been recognised by institutions such as the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the American Institute for Architects.