Universitat Internacional de Catalunya

Fieldtrip

Fieldtrip
5
13534
1
Second semester
PR
Main language of instruction: Catalan

Other languages of instruction: English, Spanish,

Teaching staff


From Monday to Friday from 10 to 17h

Introduction

This workshop intends to delve into pending issues related to the Master such as informal settlement upgrading, urban reconstruction post-disaster, urban integration of internally displaced people and refugees. We believe the integration and spatial regeneration must start at an urban scale as it is necessary to consider local communities and solutions to all these urban stressors within the overall urban planning of cities. Fostering this goal, the present practical workshop intends to work on specific problems in an international setting, on an existing project along with all the stakeholders involved (local govenment, NGOs, local univiersites) in order to develop and implement a  technical methodology which delves into the link between the social and physical aspects of any urban or architectural problem. 

 

Pre-course requirements

Be part of the Master and have attended all courses and modules before the Fieldtrip

Objectives

Our objective is to develop an integrated (from void to urban fabric) and social diagnosis in order to deliver specific regenerative proposals of the site.   Through our participation in a real project, we intend to put our expertise and the tools and methods aquired during the masters in practice. The Fieldtrip is always linked to a real need and project, therefore our contribution is part of a longer process with the objetctive of creating knowledge-transfer to the local community and at the same time creating an applied and service learning. 

Competencies

  • 01 - That students apply the knowledge acquired and the capacity to solve problems in underpriviledged places in multidisciplinary contexts related to the area of international cooperation.
  • 02 - That students may be capble of integrating knowledge and face the complexity of formulating their opinion from information which may be incomplete or limited, and that include reflections on the ethic and social responsibilities related to the area of cooperation and arquitecture in post disaster situations.
  • 03 - That students may capable of communicating the conslusions of their research as well as the knowledge and resasons that support it, to a specialized and non-specialized public, with clarity and security.
  • 06 - Aquire a specialized knowledge in the management of materials and human resources for each project development
  • 07 - Be capable of aplying to a specific project the knowledge acquired.
  • 19 - To propose and develop constructive techniques based on local cultures and materials
  • 21 - Saber aplicar los conocimientos en técnicas constructivas low-cost, fundamentales y universales, aplicables a todos aquellos países en fase de desarrollo o afectados por catástrofes naturales y humanas.
  • 22 - To know how to adapt construction materials in order to develop alternative, sustainable, and low-cost construction techniques
  • 26 - To be capable of developing, through a critical analysis, a manual that defines from a systemic point of view the priority of intervention for projects developed by international cooperation agencies.

Learning outcomes

 

The outcome of the workshop is to enable students to learn how to:

  • perform effectively in a team situation
  • develop appropriate written and oral communication skills for addressing community members’ concerns
  • work with urban and architectural methodologies/tools to target different needs felt by diverse social groups, and apply practical skills and knowledge learned elsewhere in the curriculum
  • Learn to act ethically while maintaining a balance between independent and critical professional work and responsiveness to the partners in the project
  • Build the capacity of the community members to carry out small and strategic open space and architectural betterment projects.
  • Ensure that all work developed respects and responds to ongoing urban betterment initiatives
  • Develop and work on site on a specific betterment action in order to contribute to the urban betterment and integration of the community of the area of study.

      

Teaching and learning activities

In person



  METHODOLOGY

The methodological process will follow three steps:

STEP 1          INITIAL PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT ONSITE:  identify what conditions should be reinforced and bettered after reviewing the plans developed by the local and partner institutions, and visit the intervention site.

STEP 2         SOCIAL APPROACHES

Incorporate the results and recommendations already developed by the local institutions and collaborators regarding the communitys perception with respect to housing, open spaces and socioeconomic conditions of the area. Conduct semi-structured interviews, surveys and other qualitative methods with local stakeholders and existing NGO’s as well as locals and refugees of the area to identify their needs and perceptions of the site.

 

STEP 3          SOCIO-SPATIAL INTEGRATION OF THE DATA COLLECTED AND STRATEGIC PROPOSALS 

Assess the information regarding each topic in order to develop specific proposals which bridge the physical and socially based findings. The proposals must explain how they intend to be implemented and developed (stakeholders and actors involved, phases, budgeting ideas, etc.) as well as which are the limitations and reflections.

 

STEP 4            JOINT SMALL SCALE URBAN ACTION

A small scale open space intervention (to be determined and discussed between all participants) will be developed on site with all the groups in order to contribute with our work to the betterment of the site.  

 

 

 

Evaluation systems and criteria

In person



Each student will be evaluated by their work in the following aspects:

PROCESS

  • RESULTS AND FINDINGS of the data recollection:  graphs, etc

METHODOLOGY AND PROPOSALS

  • EVALUATION OF THE PROCESS AND FINDINGS 
  • STRATEGY AND PROPOSALS
  • PHASES OF IMPLEMENTATION AND BUDGET
  • CONCLUSIONS AND BETTERMENT 
GROUP PRESENTATION

Bibliography and resources

Refugee Camp Design:

Al-Azhari, W. W. (2012). A STUDY OF HOUSING IDENTITY IN REFUGEE SETTLEMENTS IN JORDAN: AL-WAHDAT REFUGEE CAMP AS A CASE STUDY. Urban Studies (IJEEFUS) Volume 2 Number 3 , 26-45.

Al-Husban, M., & Adams, C. (2016). Sustainable Refugee Migration: A Rethink towards a Positive Capability Approach. Sustainability - Volume 8 Number 5 , 452-461.

Battistella, A., & Buonocore, M. (2015). Design in Emergencies. A Sustainable Approach to Refugee Camp Design. Architecture in (R)Evolution. Bologna: PLEA.

Byler, R., Gelaw, F., & Khoshmood, K. (2015). Beyond the Tent: Considerations for Altering the Standard Refugee Camp Design for Improved Health Outcomes. Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC) (pp. 123-128). IEEE.

Crea, T. M., & McFarland, M. (2015). Higher education for refugees: Lessons from a 4-year pilot project. International Review of Education - Volume 61 Number 2 , 235-245.

Howayek, C. (2014). No Place like a Refugee Camp. Weimar: Bauhaus-Universitat Weimar.

James, K. (2008). Structures for the Displaced: Service and Identity in Refugee Settlements . Delft: International Forum on Urbanism (IfoU).

Kennedy, J. (2004). Towards A Rationalisation of the Construction of Refugee Camps. Leuven: Center for Human Settlements, Department of Architecture, Katholieke Universitiet Leuven.

Salehin, S., Zhang, H., Marinez, T. L., Papakokkinos, G., Upadhyay, G., & Bowler, E. (2011). Designing of an emergency energy module for relief and refugee camp situations: case study for a refugee camp in Chad-Sudan border. Sustainable Technologies (WCST), 2011 World Congress on (pp. 9-11). Eindhoven: IEEE.

Wa-Mbaleka, S. (2014). An Instructional Design Model for Better Refugee and IDP Education. International Journal of Academic Research in Progressive Education and Development - Volume 3 Number 3 , 1-14.

Zetter, R., & Baker, J. (2015). Studies on Emergencies and Disaster Relief No.2. In S. P. review, Zetter&Baker (pp. 29-97). Sweden: Nordic Africa Institute.

 

Defining Refugee Settlements:

Black, R. (1998). Putting refugees in camps. Forced Migration Review , 4-7.

Dubin, L. (2011). Field Guidelines for Best Practices in Shelter Response: Site Planning, Shelter Design and Construction Management . IRC.

Schimdt, A. (2003). Fmo thematic guide: camps versus settlements. Oxford: Forced Migration Online .

Turner, S. (2016). What Is a Refugee Camp? Explorations of the Limits and Effects of the Camp. Journal of Refugee Studies (June2016) , 140-148.

UNHCR-Handbook. (2007). Handbook for Emergencies - Third edition. Geneva: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).

Geo-Political status of refugees:

1996Factors Influencing the Policy Responses of Host Governments to Mass Refugee InfluxesNew YorkThe Center for Migration Studies of New York, Inc.

Goodwin-Gill, G. S., & McAdam, J. (2007). The Refugee in International Law-Third Edition. London: Oxford University Press.

Kuti, S., Gregurovic, M., Podgorelec, S., Bogadi, S. K., & Others. (2015). Forced migration flows and the humanitarian crisis in Europe: Position paper of the Institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies. Amsterdam: Institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies.

Teaching and learning material