Universitat Internacional de Catalunya

Content Language Integrated Learning (CLIL): Theory, Practice and New Technologies

Content Language Integrated Learning (CLIL): Theory, Practice and New Technologies
6
13766
1
Annual
OB
Main language of instruction: English

Other languages of instruction: Catalan, Spanish
If the student is enrolled for the English track then classes for that subject will be taught in the same language.

Teaching staff


Helena Roquet

hroquet@uic.cat

Tuesdays 11:00-12:00 (by appointment)

 

Introduction

In the event that the health authorities announce a new period of confinement due to the evolution of the health crisis caused by COVID-19, the teaching staff will promptly communicate how this may effect the teaching methodologies and activities as well as the assessment.


Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) programmes have rapidly spread across Europe with the goal of enhancing language learning among European citizens. In Catalonia, for instance, more and more schools are incorporating CLIL subjects into their curricula in order to provide their students an optimal context for effective language learning.

This course aims to strengthen the training of future CLIL teachers by providing greater experience with language learning contexts and an in-depth analysis of the characteristics and objectives of CLIL programmes, as well as teaching and self-training strategies that will help students continue to improve as foreign language teachers. The course will employ both theoretical and practical approaches to analysing and creating materials for CLIL programmes in order to give students a comprehensive education. 

Pre-course requirements

It is recommended that students have a B2 level of English under the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) before the start of the course.

It is also recommended that students be familiar with studies performed in the field of CLIL.

Objectives

  • To become familiar with language learning contexts.
  • To reflect on the multiple factors that contributed to the emergence of CLIL in Europe.
  • To take an in-depth look at the basic principles of CLIL programmes and identify the features of successful CLIL programmes.
  • To take an in-depth look at the teaching strategies of CLIL programmes and acquire self-training strategies to keep improving as foreign language teachers.
  • To learn to design materials and activities for CLIL tasks, projects and teaching units and to use digital tools in these contexts.
  • To analyse, design and create tools for evaluting the effectiveness of CLIL tasks, projects and programmes.

Competencies

BASIC AND GENERAL COMPETENCES

CB7, CB8, CB9, CB10, CG1, CG2, CG3, CG4, CG6

CB7

To know how to apply the acquired knowledge and problem-solving abilities in new or little-known environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts related to one’s area of study.

CB8

To be able to acquire knowledge and deal with the complexity of formulating judgments based on information that, although incomplete or limited, includes reflections on the social and ethical responsibilities linked to the application of one’s knowledge and judgments.

CB9

To know how to communicate one’s conclusions and the latest knowledge and the supporting arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences in a clear and unambiguous way.

CB10

To possess the learning skills that allow one to continue studying in a way that will be largely individual or autonomous.

 

CG1

To search for, obtain, process, summarise and communicate information (oral, printed, audiovisual, digital or multimedia-based), transform it into knowledge and apply it to teaching English as a foreign language.

CG2

To develop critical thinking, problem solving, decision-making or inquiry skills, and apply these to educational reality with the aim of promoting students’ autonomy, creativity, confidence and personal initiative.

CG3

To manage work time based on learning priorities and objectives, promoting self-learning.

CG4

To communicate decision-making in the field of teaching English as a foreign language based on solid arguments.

CG6

To be able to effectively work as a part of a team in multilingual, multicultural and interdisciplinary professional and/or academic environments.

TRANSVERSAL COMPETENCES

 CT1, CT2, CT3, CT4, CT5

CT1

To apply pedagogically innovative models and educational research on the acquisition, teaching and use of English as a foreign language to specific cases, to a specific school context and/or contexts related to education, so that the theoretical knowledge acquired is suitably connected to the educational practice.

CT2

To critically analyse one’s own work and use appropriate resources and strategies to achieve professional improvement.

CT3

To incorporate information and communication technology (ICTs) into teaching and learning activities, teaching management and professional development.

CT4

To generate innovative and competitive proposals in professional or research activity.

CT5

To express oneself in public and give presentations with digital support adapted to the different interest groups in the school environment (teachers, families, students, etc.)

SPECIFIC COMPETENCES

CE1, CE3, CE4, CE5, CE6, CE7, CE11

CE1

To know and reflect on processes of the acquisition and learning of English as a foreign language and its literature and culture.

CE3

To analyse the diversity of current and innovative methodological approaches and pedagogical practices applied to different educational stages in bilingual and multilingual contexts.

CE4

To effectively apply digital resources for the teaching and learning of English and manage and promote computer-assisted language teaching programmes.

CE5

To plan the process of teaching and learning English as a foreign language and its literature and culture at different educational stages, taking the students’ level and previous knowledge into account.

CE6

To design innovative teaching proposals that promote the development of students’ linguistic, multilingual and intercultural competences, based on the requirements of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages; while also promoting reflection, openness and respect towards other languages and cultures.

CE7

To analyse and evaluate the development of students’ linguistic competence in English at different educational stages, based on the requirements of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

CE11

To use academic skills in English, both orally and in writing inside and outside the classroom as well as all the communication techniques typical of teachers of this language.

 

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes that will be required of the students will be linked to the selected competences in each case. Among others, the following stand out:

  • Reflect on the literature and culture of English as a foreign language.
  • Analyze the diversity of current and innovative methodological approaches and pedagogical practices applied to the different educational stages in bilingual and multilingual contexts.
  • Plan the process of teaching and learning English as a foreign language and its literature and culture, while taking the level and previous knowledge of the students into account.
  • Effectively apply digital resources for English language teaching and learning and manage and promote computer-assisted English language teaching programs.
  • Develop innovative projects aimed at the analysis and improvement of teaching practices using information and communication technology (ICTs).
  • Implement the different aspects of communicative competences as well as academic skills in English, both orally and in writing inside and outside the classroom, and use all the communication techniques typical of teachers of this language.
  • Design innovative didactic proposals that promote the development of the linguistic, multilingual and intercultural competences of the students, based on the requirements of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages; while also promoting reflection, openness and respect towards other languages and cultures.
  • Analyze and evaluate the development of the students' linguistic competence in English at different educational stages, base on the requirements of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Syllabus

1. Introduction. Language learning contexts

2. The emergence of CLIL in Europe

3. CLIL influences, objectives and characteristics

4. Effective CLIL programmes

5. CLIL assessment

6. Techniques, digital tools and strategies for CLIL sessions

7. Materials design, adaptation and implementation to be used in CLIL tasks, CLIL projects and CLIL didactic units

Teaching and learning activities

Online



Online methodology

1

CT- Online Lectures

2

CP- Online Practical Classes

3

RP- Problem Solving Tasks

4

EC- Case Study

5

ABP- Project-Based Learning

 

Teaching and learning activities

CML – Online Lectures

CPL – Online Practical Classes

FDV – Forums and Online Debates

TI – Individual Autonomous Work

TG – Group Autonomous Work

TL – Online Tutorials

Evaluation systems and criteria

Online



Participation in the forum and/or virtual sessions (contributions and questions after the presentation of compulsory readings; discussion and analysis of the content and the other students’ CLIL posters and teaching units)

25%

Presentation of online readings

10%

Creation and presentation of a poster on CLIL, online or via video

30%

Creation and group presentation of the teaching unit and implemention of a CLIL task, online or via video

35%

Bibliography and resources

Cenoz, J., Genesee, F. and Gorter, D. (2014). Critical Analysis of CLIL: Taking stock and looking forward. Applied Linguistics, 35(5): 243-262

Coyle, D., Hood, P. and Marsh, D. (2010). CLIL – Content and Language Integrated Learning. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press [selected chapters, but you may want to read the whole book!]

Dalton-Puffer, C. (2007) Discourse in CLIL Classrooms. (Language Learning and Language Teaching 20). Amsterdam etc.: Benjamins.

Dalton-Puffer, C. and Smit, U. (2013). Content and Language Integrated Learning. A research agenda. Language Teaching, 46, 545-559.

De Graaff, R., Koopman, G., Anikina, Y. and Westhoff , G. (2007). An Observation tool for Effective Pedagogy in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 10(5): 603-624.

Ellis, R. (2008). Principles of Instructed Second Language Acquisition. System, 33, 209-224.

Escobar Urmeneta, C. (2012). Content-Rich Language Learning in Content-Rich Classrooms, in Serra, N. and McCullough, J. (eds.) APAC Quarterly Magazine, 74.

Eurydice European Unit (2006). Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) at school in Europe. European Commission. Eurydice, Belgium.

Genesee, F. (1994). Integrating Language and Content: Lessons from Immersion. National Centre for Research on Cultural Diversity and Second Language Learning.

González-Lloret, M. (2016). A Practical Guide to Integrating Technology into Task-Based Language Teaching. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press.

Lyster, R. (2007). Learning and Teaching Languages through content: A counterbalanced approach. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Mehisto, P. (2012). Criteria for producing CLIL learning material. Encuentro: Revista de Investigación e Innovación en la clase de idiomas, 21, 15-33.

Muñoz, C. (2007). CLIL: Some thoughts on its psycholinguistics principles,  Revista española de lingüística aplicada, Volumen monográfico 1, 17-26.

Navés, T. (2009). Effective Content and Language Integrated Programmes. In Ruiz de Zarobe, Y. and  Jimenez Catalán, R. (Eds.), Content and Language Integrated Learning Evidence from Research in Europe 22-40. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

Pérez-Vidal, C. (2007). The need for focus on form in content and language integrated approaches: an exploratory study. Revista española de lingüística aplicada 1: 39-55

Pérez, Carmen. (2009). The integration of Content and Language in the classroom: A European approach to education (The second time around). In: Dafouz Milne, E.; Guerrini, M. (eds.). CLIL across educational levels: Experiences from Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Contexts 25-40 1 ed. Madrid: Santillana Educación S.L., Richmond Publishing.

Pérez-Vidal, C. (2013). Perspectives and Lessons from the Challenge of CLIL Experiences. In C. Abello-Contesse, P. M. Chandler, M. D. Lopez-Jimenez (Eds.), Bilingual and Multilingual Education in the 21st Century: Building on Experience 59- 82. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

Pérez-Vidal, C. & Campanale-Grilloni, N. (2007). Content and language integrated learning (CLIL) from a European perspective. Gràfiques Print.Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Barcelona.

Roquet, H. (2011). A study of the acquisition of English as a foreign language: Integrating content and language in mainstream education in Barcelona. Tesi Doctoral: Universitat Pompeu Fabra

Roquet, H. and Pérez-Vidal, C. (2015). ‘Do productive skills improve in content and language integrated learning contexts? The case of writing’ Applied Linguistics. DOI: 10.1093/applin/amv050.

Roza, B. (2009) Assessment and benchmarking: a new challenge for Content and Language Integrated Learning. In: Dafouz Milne, E.; Guerrini, M. (eds.). CLIL across educational levels: Experiences from Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Contexts 27-138 Richmond Publishing.

Ruiz de Zarobe, Y (2011). Which language competencies benefit from CLIL? An insigight into applied linguistics research. In  Ruiz de Zarobe, Y., Sierra, J.M., Gallardo del Puerto, F. (Eds.), Content and Foreign Language Integrated Learning: Contributions to Multilingualism in European Contexts 129- 153. Bern: Peter Lang.